How Competitive Diving Helps Judge Watches

How Competitive Diving Helps Judge Watches

“A fool and his money are soon parted.”

That is a famous proverb that seems to be the foundation of the marketing used by watch brands today. In other words, for better or worse, despite the absolute fact that watches are machines, tools, instruments of time, etc., watch brands want us to view and judge watches subjectively like jewelry. This is how you end up with gold dive watches, for example, and people foolish enough to buy them.

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Tudor Submariner 7923 And The Moron About To Pay $350K

Tudor Submariner 7923 And The Moron About To Pay $350K

This past March there was an auction for an old Tudor Submariner. This watch is unique because it is the only reference Submariner made by either Rolex or Tudor that has a manual wound movement. The other thing that is interesting about this particular example is that it really does appear to be completely original and untouched, but also in really amazing condition. As you will see in the photos, it definitely looks old and has signs of aging, but the case is still really crisp and its original finish is mostly there, even the bezel insert wasn’t changed and the lume is still untouched.

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Top 10 Most "Attainable" Watches

Top 10 Most "Attainable" Watches

A little while ago I put together 'The Ultimate Watch Collection'. A collection where money is no object.

But, what if money is an object?

In other words, if we wanted to build a watch collection of 'attainable' watches, where attainable isn't necessarily cheap, but that a person making an average salary could, with time, save up to buy at least a couple, what would that look like?

Well, I'm about to tell you (in no particular order), and yes there are watches in this list that overlap with the "ultimate watch collection", and thats because money isn't everything.

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Watch Cases

Watch Cases

You are right that most manufacturers make good cases, especially today. And you are right that Rolex has earned a reputation for making great cases since the introduction of their Oyster case. A case design, which has defined them as a 'tool watch' company and how Rolex continues to define themselves as a brand today.

And to me, the importance of a case is extremely high, and this goes beyond the fact that the watch case is the most visible part of a watch that most demonstrates a watch company's design capabilities, etc.

To illustrate, think about how the Oyster case came to be.

It all started in the early 1900's. Up to that point only women really wore wristwatches. Men wore pocket watches.

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The Ultimate Watch Collection: Summary

The Ultimate Watch Collection: Summary

Today, a convenient summary!

I think the following summary, in chart form should be a lot of fun. And as you will see, it makes it real easy to visualize alternative combinations. I.e., if you prefer the Calatrava to the Reverso, cool. In your personal chart/list, you could just swap them, and it'd still make sense...

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It's a Watch, not a "Timepiece"

It's a Watch, not a "Timepiece"

I have a huge pet peeve when it comes to the watch hobby/industry and its the word timepiece.

A watch is a watch, not a friggin' timepiece. If you insist on saying timepiece, then you need to know and accept you're an horological douchebag.

Remember, watches are first and foremost machines, tools, instruments, but they are not jewelry or art, therefore, they are not timepieces. Sure, watchmakers have taken their craft to levels that definitely rival great works of art, the same way a Ferrari does in the automotive industry. But just like a Ferrari is still a car not a travel-piece, a watch is still a watch. Not a timepiece.

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Rolex Deepsea Sea-Dweller w/D-Blue Dial

Rolex Deepsea Sea-Dweller w/D-Blue Dial

While many of the high-end watch brands were introducing some pretty impressive new watches, with some serious innovations, Rolex released a new version of their Sea-Dweller called the Deepsea with a D-blue dial.

One of the "innovations" on this watch is the Blue Luminescence, which features a "chromalight display" whose blue glow lasts up to twice as long as that of standard luminescent materials. This particular shade of blue is the last visible color the human eye can see at extreme depths.

The dial itself incorporates this shade as well, and will shift from black to blue depending on how light hits the dial.

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